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   Use on Cell Phones - Keys - Wallets - Purses - Glasses - Remote Controls.
   The possibilities are endless! Complete with Batteries & Easy-to-Use Instructions.

 

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        CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION & HOW TO ORDER!

               Get yours now while supplies last  (and we're not kidding!)

As well as selling our unique key finder system, when we fix something or discover a solution, we like to share -  here is another page to help out. DJM.  All material here - Copyright (C) 2009 Melbourne Designs, LLC. OK, so it's also a cheap plug to advertise FOFA - please forgive us!  

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Use at your own risk - we bear no responsibility for any injury or damage caused by the use of this information.
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 or monetarily) following any advice or information offered here or any other page we host.

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Toyota Sienna Rear Door Handle Broken - Help!
Worked on 2001, Anyone know about 1999, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008  Unknown if applicable - anyone?)

For help with Toyota Door Handle replacement click here

For help with Toyota Sienna Knock Sensors click here 

For help with Toyota Sienna Oxygen Sensors click here. 

For help with Toyota Sienna Misfire Codes click here. 

For help with Toyota Sienna Evap Codes P0446 P0440 P0441 P0442

Read the Story of our Toyota Sludged Engine Repair.

For help programming your remote door lock fob / keyfob


  Save this Page!


                    

You go to open your rear door and snap! The handle breaks - Now What?

This happens to a lot of Sienna vans (1999,2000,2001), and also to lots of different Toyotas as well, judging by a search on the web. Why? Plastic handles. Why, in heavens name, would they use plastic handles? It happened to us, my wife tried to open the rear door, but heard a crack, then the handle went limp. Sounds familiar?

What now? Take it to a dealership and be charged hundreds to repair? The web says "new handle- $64.00 at the dealer,
most quoted over $300.00 to have them do it"
  From the web, I also found out they just break again!
What was needed was a "better than replacement" fix.  

 TIP - TAKE LOTS OF DIGITAL PICTURES BEFORE EACH PART IS REMOVED!  (WITH A GOOD CAMERA WITH A GOOD SIZED SCREEN)

1st Problem - The door won't open at all.
(One contributor did suggest you might be able to grab the loose cable and pull it form the outside - but we have not tried this)

Here's what we did....

Lower rear seats, climb in rear.
Remove 10mm bolts under plastic covers on pull down handle and also remove the 10mm bolt that holds the strap on.
Pull off rear panel - See picture. It is held on by about 10 white push-in clips. The clips may fall off and go everywhere - don't worry, they will go back on.

                

Wrestle cover out of inside of van. Now you have access to the latch, pull up the lever, opening the rear door. Fall out of van carefully. I didn't. Ouch.

                      
                                                                                             "Where is your wallet?" ™

Remove the internal (3) 10mm nuts holding the lock/handle cover plate on. Squeeze the white clip in the end position.
Pull this away from the door a little. The backup light wires are still attached, so you cannot pull far. Remove the 2 screws that hold the handle to this plate, and remove the latch cable (it just pulls off). You can now see where the handle has broken.


OK, I have got it off. How did you fix it?

Rather than replace the handle for another one that will break again, I drilled a hole through both the handle and the broken arm piece and bolted them together. While glue alone would never last (the torque on the handle is considerable), many folks have suggested superglue to hold them together while you drill the bore hole - use a slow drill rpm! (Thanks Wolfwar99). Just be careful, fingers are more expensive than the $300 fix don't forget! Mike (see below) reminded me to say "use a drill press to make the bore hole" Good idea! I did, of course - never thought anyone would consider doing it by hand! Also, you will have to enlarge the square hole in the metal plate to stop the nut from catching on it. I forgot this and many comments have suggested including this important step. PLEASE BE CAREFUL WITH THE DRILLING PART!

This fix is a bit of a fiddle (OK quite a fiddle), but the result is a permanent fix. See pictures & comments below.


Here you see the handle with a close-up of the break. This was after the 
screw was inserted.  The screw and nut came out of the "big box of loose screws" we all seem to have, so your sizing may vary. Use a strong one. Stainless steel is a good idea as it won't rust. If anyone comes up with a recommended size - please email & we will include it here! 

From Rob - 1 1/4" 4-40 screw, but I ended up using a size 8-32, 1 1/4 ".  The nut ended up being a bit large so I used a drill and Dremmel sander bit to enlarge the hole a bit.

More pictures of the fix.

Once you have repaired the handle, reverse the procedure and put your van back into service. Cost? $2 in a screw and nut. Some thread lock might be a good idea too.

Mike sent us some pictures of his fix, they show the hole enlargement and screw position better than mine. Thanks Mike!

UPDATE 09/5/2009

A word of Thanks to the hundreds that have donated a buck to my cause - trying to save all of you the dreaded dealer repairs!
The money has helped convince my wife in my continuing to put up "Fix-it" pages - it is fun to share.

Thanks, also, to those who could only afford "Thanks" and got in contact - that means quite a bit too.

 

Did you find this useful? We would love to hear!  (See Contact page) We will add your comments here (no full names or email addresses of course!)

Here's how to send $1

Here's a way to say Thanks. (PayPal) Was it worth a dollar? (Don't make it more or I will get a big head)


                                                     
FEEDBACK 

Thanks for the article.....I'm looking forward to fixing it ;)

I just bought one ($49), looks great! _ DJM

http://www.1aauto.com/1A/TailgateHandles/Toyota/Sienna/1ABTH00049/1044178

Update - Still available as of 9/2011!

5/13/2009 Latest update from Gus : You might have to use just the metal handle as the whole thing would not fit in his 1999 (a part of the aftermarket handle was too big) But at least the handle is still metal though! Your experience may vary from year model to year model also.

Sir/Madame,

I wish I had spent some time looking on the web.  The rear door latch handle broke on my 1999 Sienna, and I took it to the dealer to the tune of $ 210.00 to get it fixed!  Man, was I steamed! Gary D 

I  am so sorry - This was what we were trying to help people avoid!
As I repair further things on the Sienna, I will keep updating. DJM
                                              ----------------------------------------- 

The instructions for repairing broken Toyota Sienna rear door handle were excellent and saved me almost $300. Thank you
  - Dave C

That is great news! DJM
                                               ----------------------------------------- 
I am writing to let you know that I think your instructions on how to repair the Toyota Sienna Rear Door Handle are great.  I especially appreciate the diagrams.  However, I would appreciate if you could let me know if there is a trick to releasing the plastic spring clips so I may pull off the back panel.  (They do not seem to want to release and I do not want to force them if that may damage the panel.)  Thanks again for your help. JPS

To remove the plastic clips holding the rear panel, use a flat blade screw driver to gently pry them off.  Put the screw driver under the panel and gently leverage them off.  Once the first one is off, the remaining clips are more easily removed. We are glad you've found the article useful.  Let me know if you have any other questions
DavidM

Hi Dave,
Thank you very much for taking the time to put up your page on how to repair a Toyota Sienna rear door handle.  I was about to take mine in for service and thought I'd Google the problem to see how common it was.  You page came up high in the list and saved me $300!!  The pictures made to disassembly a breeze.  I bolted the pieces back together as you described. I'd say it is trickier than "a bit of a fiddle", but it still didn't take very long to do.
 
Thanks again!!
Carl J

Good job! (I guess I am used to "fiddling" - LOL)  DJM
                                                    
----------------------------------------- 
12/02/05

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU for the information.  I was ready to schedule a leisure major expense visit to the dealership when I found your website.  Everything disassembled EXACTLY per your instructions. 

Now my challenge is bolting the broken “finger” to the actual handle.  Did you use something to compress the actual latch release so that you could drill a properly aligned hole, or did you completely disassemble the handle at the hinge and do the drill bolt process then?  I am baffled as how to proceed.  Any further instruction that you provide is greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,  Fred M

Dear Fred,
You must disassemble the handle to leave just the handle and the broken part. Drilling the hole in the 2 pieces is a challenging part BTW.
Also, you may have to enlarge the small square hole in the metal handle frame to allow the nut end to miss the frame.
Now we discover ALL the doors have plastic handles - ARRHHHGG!
Best of luck with it & Happy Holidays!
 
DavidM
                                                   ---------------------------------------- 

 

Hi,

I’m glad I found your website.

It works! Thank you!

I took me less than hour (including a trip to hardware store for bolt and nut) to fix it!

 Kindest Regards,

 Happy reader,

 Tom H

Dear Tom,

We are glad it was helpful - one more Sienna that can open the tailgate again!

DJM                                   ----------------------------------------- 

Great idea DJM!   Here’s a suggestion - when getting ready to drill the two pieces, glue them together with Superglue and this will keep them aligned while drilling.

 Thanks, Rob in Austin

Great suggestion! Thanks Rob!
 

Update 01/04/06
Thanks so much for the great instructions.  I too, saved several hundred dollars using your method.  As for a screw, the ideal screw would be a 1 1/4" 4-40 screw, but I ended up using a size 8-32, 1 1/4 ".  The nut ended up being a bit large so I used a drill and dremmel sander bit to enlarge the hole a bit.
 
I don't think the screw size is as important as the length - 1 1/4" is key.  Use brass or stainless steel.
 
I superglued the parts together before drilling, which made the drilling part fairly easy.
 
Thanks again! 
 
Rob

                                                            ----------------------------------------- 

Update 02/19/06
Howdy DJM,

I was googling for parts lists to figure out the Sienna rear door handle assembly, when I found your website, instructions and testimonials. Intrigued by the possibility of saving hundred's of dollars, I decided to fix the handle myself.

It took me more than twenty minutes - in all I probably invested 2 hrs of my time, but I feel very satisfied with what I accomplished. I purchased the recommended bolt & nut (1-1/4" 4-40), and used superglue to bond the broken lever arm. I was stumped by the "geometry" of where to drill, figured it out, and asked a neighbor with a drill press to do the honors. After fastening the nut & bolt, and tentatively reassembling the handle, I found that the nut did not pass the hole in the bracket. I used a chainsaw sharpening file to open the hole.

Key lessons for me:
I've attached some photos of the handle I repaired, with special emphasis on the geometry of where the bolt & nut are placed in the plastic handle.

Thanks,

Mike

                                                        -----------------------------------------

Well Done Mike!  I included the photos above! 

David Melbourne
Melbourne Designs, LLC
www.FindOneFindAll.com
(866) 245-8670

                                            -----------------------------------------

Update 03/05/06
1999 Toyota Sienna rear door handle fix. Right-on!
Thanks, yours was the first response and the last one I needed for this.  Of course, my handle broke right as I was loading 700 lbs. of redi-mix concrete in bags in the back.  Now I will have to crawl over them to get at the interior of the door.  But, at least I know what I need to do.  Thanks again, Scot

Scot,
Sorry about the concrete mix - that is going to make it even harder to do!
Someone told me you could grab the small broken handle piece with pliers from the outside and open it, but I had no success doing that. Good luck with your fix.

DJM
                                                  -----------------------------------------

Just want to say "Thank you so very much".  I fix my 1999 Sienna XLE handle in just less than 2 hours.
You are the MAN !!

Kev.

When you drill the hole, make it smaller than the screw and let it thread itself eliminating the need for the nut - which is a pain anyway!  Otherwise, GREAT ADVICE found here!!  Thank You!!

Stephanie

Great idea Stephanie - Remember though, you are only drilling into plastic, which might not be very strong when threaded.
- Let us know how this version works out over time! David.

                                                 -----------------------------------------

Thanks so much for the instructions on how to do this.  I am not quite finished with the job, but I discovered something additional that might be of value to others.

As I was discussing with my teen-ager what to use as an adhesive to hold the latch-handle pieces together in order to accurately drill the hole for the #4 machine screw, he mentioned how impressed he had been with
the solvent we had used in a plexiglass aquarium project a few years ago.  The aquarium had never worked right, but it also had never leaked. I searched around and found the rest of the solvent (we had bought a 4-oz. container for, I think, about $10.)  Turns out that solvent dissolves the latch handle material very nicely, which allowed me to
create a quite secure plastic weld at the broken point.  Because the real problem is the design of the part, I am adding the screw, but having the latch-handle's pieces welded firmly together while drilling has been very helpful.  The solvent I used was IPS WELD-ON #3, whose label says it is for joining acrylic.  It is transparent and watery, and
it has a very distinct odor.  I found it at the plastics place in an industrial park, which also sold us a very convenient small dispenser bottle.  Try the Yellow Pages under "plastic," or maybe Home Depot/Lowe's has something like it. Perhaps anything for joining acrylics will work as well.

John S.

 -Thanks for the idea John, holding the pieces together safely while it is drilled is probably the only tough bit of the job -

DJM
                                                      -----------------------------------------

I did finish the part and it works great! the only hard part was the drilling. the plastic will melt so you should add that it should be drilled at a slow rpm!!! i used a Bridgport and drilled at aprox. 90 rpm and was still too fast. the plastic right at the break started to melt just enough to break the superglue holding it but it still worked great. also i found the 4-40 was a bit too thin so i drilled using a .140" drill bit and used a #6 screw. is a bit stronger and still allowed enough plastic on the sides for strength.it took me about 40 mins to do the entire job.  thank you very much again.  

 wolfwar99

The slower drill speed does sound like a good idea! Thanks - DJM

  -----------------------------------------

Guys, you saved me about $200!  I followed the instructions with one variation. Rather than drill a hole and fool with all of that, I broke down and purchased a new handle for $94. Your instructions helped me take off the back panel and replace the broken part. Total time was about 45 minutes. The dealer wanted to charge me $300 for the job and they quoted me about 3 days (they are very busy!).  Yes, the handle may break again, but the first one lasted 10 years, so I’ll take my chances.  For those who want to take a short cut, this is the way to go.  Thanks again for your instructions.

 Bob , TN.

Bob, this is the best idea for those who don't want to mess around with a drill! (No idea how long a new one will last of course!)
- DJM  
                                                         -----------------------------------------

Dealer quoted $400 for repair.  Not having a drill press or being much mechanically inclined, I purchased a replacement door latch handle assembly ($65) and followed the instructions to remove the back panel. Handle replaced and tools stored in 30 minutes.  I
encourage anyone to try--well worth the effort.

Thanks.  John R. 

Good work work John - one more $400 the dealer won't get! Now you can honestly put on your resume that you have worked for an equivalent $800 per hour! LOL - DJM
                                                             -----------------------------------------

Gentlemen,  At least 145 thanks because that's how much you saved me. I found your web page and it gave me hope of  doing the handle replacement on my wife's 1998 Sienna.  It worked !!! I have bookmarked you site. Regards, 

Michael S  01/08/2007

Well done Mike! The real plus is that it won't break again (as long as you used a strong bolt/screw!)
 One day, auto makers will realize that we like to keep our vehicles longer than 3 years and make the handles and things out of metal again.
 
Best Regards,

 David Melbourne
Melbourne Designs, LLC
www.FindOneFindAll.com
(866) 245-8670

                                                                      -----------------------------------------

Dave:

..... Great instructions and feedback from all the other folks. Thanks so much for posting.  The door disassembly was straight forward, and extracting the handle was a cinch.  I did take the opportunity to take some detergent and a tooth brush and clean all the parts.  Plus I looked into my light bulb stocks and took the opportunity to test and change the license plate light bulbs too. The two optimizations I did do were to use a two-stage drilling process and spread epoxy on the hole and threads before inserting and tightening the screw.  The two stage drilling process just means I drilled the first hole only in the top main handle latch. I started from the face of the break to make sure it would be centered on the break.  After gluing, the hole on the main section acted as a guide to drill into the arm.  I didn't use a retaining nut, but filled the hole with epoxy and used some on the screw threads too to fix the screw inside without a nut on the end.  Wow!  It's tight now and doesn't flex at all because of real metal inside!

Thanks again for posting these tips.

-James
Sunnyvale, CA

Thanks James - I think you said something I forgot to, THANKS to all those that have provided feedback. This truly is a great way for all of us to share on a fix that saves a large amount of money. (Who can afford dealerships for stuff like this anyway?)
Keep it coming folks! DJM 02/11/07

 

Update from David 05/14/07 ENGINE OVERHAUL BECAUSE OF SLUDGE!

I just put the ENGINE back in the van! Seems the crankcase gases are not well ventilated on our Siennas (1998-2002) and any dinosaur oil left in the engine for any length of time (3001 Miles!) turns to SLUDGE! Couple that with very small oil return lines within the engine, hot spots in the cylinder heads that reach 260 deg, and you get black nasty SLUDGE. Toyota was sued and had to come up with 

 www.oilgelsettlement.com

which is a complete waste of time (they do NOT rod the oil returns looking for blockages) I spotted the lowering oil pressure in time to pull the engine and have it de-sludged and overhauled at
Automotive Machine in Fort Worth.

 Now runs very smooth with synthetic oil and newly installed OIL PRESSURE GAUGEBe careful -  the engine and transmission come out the bottom on a subframe together and they are very HEAVY!

If you do have sludge - DO NOT try to wash it out of the engine using engine cleaner! This will just make it mobile and cause an "oil clot" somewhere else. Have Toyota look at it - you might be lucky and find a dealership that really cares. I didn't though.

Good Luck!

DJM

Was this Helpful? Send us a Dollar! (And Thank you to the many that have!)

Here's a way to say Thanks. (PayPal) Was it worth a dollar? (Don't make it more or I will get a big head)

                                                                               -----------------------------------------
Links

Questions Demo Contact Home Page About Us Order Here key finder, remote control locator, remote finder, keyfinder, lost keys finder,  63-1155

A Set of FOFA Key Finders

NEW!  Are you tired of Losing your stuff?
                      (Are you tired of someone else losing their stuff?)

 Use your Wallet to Find Your Keys and Vice Versa!

  FOFA - XD! Our Patented 2-Way Wireless Key Finders.
 
No Base to lose - Each can find the others - Expandable
   Use on Cell Phones - Keys - Wallets - Purses - Glasses - Remote Controls.
   The possibilities are endless! Complete with Batteries & Easy-to-Use Instructions.

 

 Lose the Stress Instead! A Set of 2 FOFA Key Fobs for just $2495  +S&H

        CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION & HOW TO ORDER!

               Get yours now while supplies last  (and we're not kidding!)




As well as selling our unique key finder system, when we fix something or discover a solution, we like to share -  here is another page to help out. DJM.  All material here - Copyright (C) 2009 Melbourne Designs, LLC. OK, so it's also a cheap plug to advertise FOFA - please forgive us!